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This Raleigh Edition of the Dymaxion (TM) map, first designed in Raleigh, North Carolina, is a vivid color reproduction of the original rendition created by R. Buckminster Fuller in 1954 in his office there. We have reproduced the map exactly as it was first conceived and produced by its creator. Both the land masses and the grayscale shading in the oceans represent mean low annual temperatures. The visionary Fuller designed this map to help us recognize that 'we're all astronauts aboard a little spaceship called Earth.' Because it can be reconfigured into a variety of patterns, it also communicated the point that 'there are many ways to see the world.'  Prices from $20.

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Buckminster Fuller Raleigh Edition Dymaxion Map  

Teachers will find it intriguing to have students analyze the map and the surrounding text and compare them with current data. For example: see what changes exist in the most populous cities, the time it takes to travel by air or by sea to different places, and most importantly…the changes in mean annual temperatures. The visionary Fuller designed this map to help us recognize that "we're all astronauts aboard a little spaceship called Earth."  Because it can be reconfigured into a variety of patterns, it also communicated the point that “there are many ways to see the world.”  Students can explore various issues, such as the multiplicity of directions of the compass direction “North” across the face of the map. Fuller’s map has also been reconfigured by oceanographers to have the oceans as the primary focus, with the separations taking place on the land instead of the sea. An excellent tool for class discussions, it can be used also for creative writing, media literacy, geography, philosophy, and global studies.

The Dymaxion map is a projection of a World map onto the surface of a polyhedron, which can then be unfolded to a flat surface to form a two-dimensional map. This unfolded map (see an animation of the map unfolding at: http://www.westnet.com/~crywalt/unfold.html) retains much of the relative proportional integrity of a globe -- or the earth itself. Buckminster Fuller first patented the map in 1946. In 1954 he published this version under the title The AirOcean World Map, which used a slightly modified but mostly regular icosahedron (a 20-sided solid; each side is in the shape of a triangle) as the basis for the projection. This is the version most commonly referred to today. The name Dymaxion is derived from his combination of “dynamic” plus “maximum” plus “tension.”  Unlike some other projections, the Dymaxion is intended purely for representations of the entire globe.


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