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This Raleigh Edition of the Dymaxion (TM) map, first designed in Raleigh, North Carolina, is a vivid color reproduction of the original rendition created by R. Buckminster Fuller in 1954 in his office there. We have reproduced the map exactly as it was first conceived and produced by its creator. Both the land masses and the grayscale shading in the oceans represent mean low annual temperatures. The visionary Fuller designed this map to help us recognize that 'we're all astronauts aboard a little spaceship called Earth.' Because it can be reconfigured into a variety of patterns, it also communicated the point that 'there are many ways to see the world.'  Prices from $20.

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Buckminster Fuller Raleigh Edition Dymaxion Map  

Fuller claimed his map had several advantages over other projections for world maps, namely less distortion of relative size of areas, most notably when compared to the Mercator projection; and less distortion of shapes of areas, notably when compared to the Peters. Other compromise projections attempt a similar trade-off. The Dymaxion map is unusual in that it has no "right way up". Fuller frequently argued that in the universe there is no "up" and "down", or "north" and "south": only "in" and "out.”  Gravitational forces of the stars and planets created "in", meaning 'towards the gravitational center', and "out", meaning "away from the gravitational center". He linked the north-up-superior/south-down-inferior presentation of most other world maps to cultural bias. ODT carries a number of South-on-top maps for exactly this reason  (see them at http://odtmaps.com/south-up-world-maps.48.0.0.1.htm). Thus there is no one "correct" view of the Dymaxion map.

The peeling of the triangular faces of the icosahedron apart in the way shown on this version of the map, reveals an almost contiguous land mass comprising all of earth's continents - not groups of continents divided by oceans. Alternatively, an approach preferred by oceanographers, peeling the solid apart in a different way presents a view of the world dominated by connected oceans and surrounded by land.


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